🔥7161

Pussy rap is an ongoing subgenre within rap that wouldn’t exist without the contributions of countless Black women. Here are the 18 essential pussy rap albums that belong in the canon.

Over the last few years, female rappers have delved into what many on the internet are referring to as “pussy rap,” a sub genre of rap where woman embrace their sexual prowess.

The root of this genre within hip-hop goes back decades. Before there was pussy rap icons like Lil’ Kim, Foxy Brown, and Missy Elliott, Salt-N-Pepa had already shelled out a plethora of lyrics centering sex. On their classic fourth album, Very Necessary, Cheryl “Salt” James, Sandy “Pepa” Denton, and Deidra “Spinderella” Roper addressed oral sex, slut-shaming, double standards, and their sexual agency. At the time of its release, the album bursted through a glass ceiling. It also flipped cultural mores on their head.

As the decade went on, pussy rap got bolder, raunchier. And by the time Trina and her fiery, explicit lyrics arrived in 2000, all these women — including Kim, Foxy, Gangsta Boo, and Mia X — were having direct conversation with each other. Their lyrics provided a look at Black women’s intimate lives which are often told from a man’s perspective. Stories of sexual exploits and carnal acts accompanied by bass heavy beats became female rapper’s contributions to the narrative of hip-hop.

During the mid 2000s — while trailblazing acts like Missy Elliott managed to have the industry in a stronghold — hungry lyricists like Remy Ma, a Bronx rapper with Fat Joe’s Terror Squad, were also lurking in the shadows. Before her debut album There’s Something About Remy: Based On A True Story arrived in 2006, she was known in New York for her presence on the mixtape scene. In 2007, she was arrested on attempted murder charges. And by the next year, she was convicted of intentional assault and sentenced to a six-year prison sentence, derailing her career. 

As the years progressed, a window of opportunity opened up for one woman to swoop in and stake her claim, Queens rapper Nicki Minaj did just that. With the success of underground releases, she got the attention of Lil’ Wayne and later dropped Playtime Is Over and Sucka Free. Both of these mixtapes led Nicki to garner attention due to her witty wordplay and dizzying delivery. 

Beam Me Up Scotty, the lyrically driven mixtape that arrived before her first studio album in 2010, is what led her on her path to the mainstream. It was critically acclaimed, provocative, and proved that there was room for a reigning sex-positive female rapper. Later, her appearance on Kanye West’s “Monster” also presented Minaj as one of the industry’s fiercest lyricists. 

Riding on the coattails of Minaj, contemporary female rappers have followed in the footsteps of their predecessors. Today’s women who are creating “pussy rap” music that speaks to their sexual experiences are lead by rappers like Cardi B, Megan Thee Stallion, Doja Cat, and City Girls

Cardi B’s social media stardom and successful mixtape run primed her for the execution of her critically acclaimed debut Invasion Of Privacy, which won “Best Rap Album” at the 2019 Grammy Awards, making her the first female rapper to win in this category. 

Elsewhere, Houston native, Megan Thee Stallion has found tremendous success with her braggadocios rhymes. On her breakout tape Tina Snow, Megan doesn’t just address her sexual appetite, she also touches on her urges, how she only has sex with men if it benefits her monetarily. 

Combining the talent that oozes from both Megan Thee Stallion and Cardi B led to the viral moment that followed the release of “WAP.” This single, equipped with a monster beat and a vulgar music video, centered Black women’s sexual autonomy, but it also proved that women want to hear other women rapping about their sexual pleasure. 

Female rappers have come a long way when it comes to their openness with divulging the private parts of their lives. Pussy rap is an ongoing subgenre within rap that wouldn’t exist without the contributions of countless Black women. In the male-dominated industry, the music from these women has provided some respite from the patriarchy and misogyny that is often heard from the mouths of male rappers who are the faces of mainstream hip-hop.

With Women’s History Month closing, we decided to have four Black women culture writers handpick the essential pussy rap albums that belong in the canon. These women are also the hosts and co-moderators of the weekly show Pussy Rap & All of That, a series that was founded on Clubhouse to address the toxic masculinity often found in rooms on the platform.

Check the 18 essential pussy rap albums below.

The ‘90s: Pussy rap’s rise

Arguably one of the greatest rap releases in history, Lil Kim’s 1996 debut, Hard Core, dives into sexually explicit and cutthroat bars in a way people hadn’t heard from a woman rapper before. Graphic: @popephoenix for Okayplayer

Salt-N-Pepe — Very Necessary (1993) 

With the release of their fourth studio album, Very Necessary, Salt, Pepa, and Spinderella would dominate mainstream music and redefine feminism in hip-hop. Three years after releasing “Let’s Talk About Sex,” the ladies pushed the narrative towards offering honest perspectives on the then-daunting notion of embracing sexual agency openly. Dancehall-inspired “Groove Me” and lyrically-sharp “Heaven or Hell” both find a sobering balance between overt sexual prowess and reality based messages. The iconic singles “Whatta Man” featuring En Vogue, “None of Your Business“, and funky-mid tempo groove “Shoop” left a profound impact on the next generation of women MCs that followed. — Kia Turner

Lil Kim — Hard Core (1996)  

Arguably one of the greatest rap releases in history, Lil Kim’s 1996 debut, Hard Core, dives into sexually explicit and cutthroat bars in a way people hadn’t heard from a woman rapper before. With songs like “Crush On You” and “Not Tonight”, the 4’11” Brooklyn raptress with a razor sharp tongue paraded her desire to stick men for their pesos, have her G-spot hit the right way, and make them blush, laying the foundation for “pussy rap” to follow. — Mikeisha Daché Vaughn

Foxy Brown — Ill Nana (1996) 

On November 19, 1996 Foxy Brown dropped her debut Ill Na Na, after storming the scene with murderous bars that grabbed everyone’s attention. Releasing just a week after Hard Core, Foxy joined her in ushering in a generation of women who weren’t afraid to be their sexual selves. On lead singles like “I’ll Be Good”, Foxy came out the gate with lyrics like “What up pop? brace yourself as I ride on top/Close your eyes as you ride right out your socks,” making it known that she had no plans of shying away from shining a light on her autonomy. — MDV

Magnolia Shorty — Monkey on tha D$ck (1997)  

Signing to Cash Money Records at just 15 years old, in 1997, Magnolia Shorty forged a blazing path for Southern women MCs with the release of her hood classic Monkey on Tha Dick. Playing upon the cultural influence of the song, she uses a bit of borrowing from DJ Jubilee and Lil’ Slim’s “Bounce Slide Ride” to create a track that plays upon the duality of women, and the culture of her hometown. Despite her tragic murder in 2010, the resurgence of her voice through the bounce trend in the late ‘10s has helped immortalize one of New Orleans’ brightest stars. — KT

Mia X — Unlady like (1997) 

Louisiana-bred rapper Mia X was the first woman to sign a music contract with No Limit. She released her debut album, Good Girl Gone Bad, in 1995, following it with her sophomore album Unlady Like which proved to be more successful, peaking at No. 21 on the Billboard 200. In true New Orleans style Mia X flows over bounce laced beats. On the track “All N’s” she calls out men, noting that they do anything to get sex from women, including shelling out money, lying, crying and committing crimes. On the title track, she plays on what men she engages with may think they’ve seen when it comes to her interactions with other men. With slick lyrics that instruct men during intercourse like: “Don’t forget to lick the pussy nigga, eat your Wheaties/Cause you gon’ need to bust about three or four nuts, no speedys,” Mia X could easily be dubbed the script flipper. — MDV

Gangsta Boo — Enquiring Minds (1998) 

In 1995, Gangsta Boo joined the legendary group Three 6 Mafia, as the sole woman in the group, a noticeable trend amongst predominantly male rap collectives in the ‘90s. Three years after joining the group, Gangsta Boo released her debut album, Enquiring Minds. Alongside her male group mates, she unleashed tracks like “Suck A Little Dick” where she volleys the lyrics “Eat a little cat or something” with DJ Paul. With the same edge, Gangsta Boo approached her sexual and monetary desires on “Where Dem Dollas At” and “Nasty Trick”, putting men in their place — on their knees. — MDV

2000-2010: The Pussy rap boom

Missy

The theme on Missy Elliott’s Miss E… So Addictive  is simple  — sex for women shouldn’t be treated like a pit stop. Graphic: @popephoenix for Okayplayer

Trina — Da Baddest Bitch (2000)  

Trina burst onto the rap scene with a debut album that had so much force, not exalting it would be a disservice to the sub-genre “pussy rap.” The rapper’s fiery personality paired with the commanding anthem in the title track solidified her as a force outside of her career partner, Trick Daddy. Conviction bleeds in her voice in the aforementioned track in the opening line, “I’m representin’ for the bitches, all eyes on your riches. No time for the little dicks” as she sets the standard for herself and other women. — Laja Hill

Eve — Scorpion (2001)

The sophomore slump eluded Miss “pitbull in a skirt. On Scorpion, Eve showcased a softer side with commercial singles like “Let Me Blow Your Mind” which cleverly gives a lesson in seduction. Eve redefines sexy as not solely resting upon vulgarity unlike her counterparts (though a collaboration with peer Trina lives on “Gangsta Bitches.”) A symbol of lust and sex lingers as the scorpion represents in many cultures, the rapper teases a potential lover in “You Ain’t Gettin’ None” as to confirm the power of her weapon — her pussy. — LH 

Missy Elliott — Miss E… So Addictive (2001) 

Missy Elliott’s Miss E… So Addictive wasn’t the first time she’d treaded on the thin line of sexually suggestive topics. But it marked a beginning in how hip-hop would accept women of all shapes, sizes, and color addressing their idea of desirability and pleasure. “X-tasy” and “Dog In Heat,” featuring Method Man and Redman, exude confidence and boldness. But, it’s “One Minute Man” featuring Ludacris that has stood the test of time and truly encompasses how sensual this album truly is. The song and album’s theme is simple  — sex for women shouldn’t be treated like a pit stop. — KT

Khia — Thug Misses (2002)

From the low budget album cover to the simplistic early 2000s production, Khia’s Thug Misses would have easily gone under the radar if it wasn’t for a platinum hit. Before going viral was a thing, Khia pulled off a memorable moment with “My Neck, My Back,” a classic that has endured for almost 20 years. Similar to the iconic “Back That Azz Up” build up, “All you ladies pop yo pussy like this” is an instant party starter. The song is filled with more empowerment than intended as Khia demands the pleasure she’d like to receive. There’s no begging when she raps, “You might roll dubs, you might have G’s / But fuck that nigga, get on yo knees!” Khia may never make another hit as impactful as “My Neck, My Back” but Thug Misses proves that hood girls are feminist icons too. — KT

Jacki-O — Poe Little Rich Girl (2004)  

Miami native Jacki-O entered the rap game with a strong Southern sound of heavy bass, sex talk, and storytelling in Poe Little Rich Girl. The first track, “Living It Up“, immediately sets the tone on how ghetto girls can have luxurious lifestyles on their own terms which isn’t abnormal to a world class city like Miami. Agency appears as a recurring theme throughout the project as Jacki-O honors the beauty, privilege, and politics of being a woman with “Pussy (Real Good)” and the popular hit “Fine” featuring the Ying Yang Twins. Though now retired, Jacki-O’s short stint in the game helped pave a lane for future projects like City Girls’ Period. — LH

Shawnna — Block Music (2006) 

After a not so stellar performing — though critically acclaimed — first album and hit features with acts like Ludacris and Mariah Carey, Shawnna thrusted through on her sophomore project Block Music. This was largely thanks to the inescapable “Gettin’ Some.” By flipping the script with a sex act that is often used to dehumanize women, she redefines pussy power by displaying dominance through role reversal. She goes on to further explore the dynamics of sex in rap on tracks like “Take It Slow” by unveiling the sensual needs juxtaposed against more titillating tracks.  — LH

Nicki Minaj — Beam Me Up Scotty (2009) 

Nicki Minaj’s Beam Me Up Scotty was a moment. Though it was Nicki’s third mixtape, it was the first that forced the industry’s hand. On it, the Queens rapper presented herself as a multifaceted lyricist. The project brought a well-needed burst of energy that rap needed at the time and also provided a glimpse into Nicki’s forthcoming reign in female hip-hop. On “I Get Crazy,” she confidently commanded the beat while serving up self-assertive, braggadocious lyrics. “Itty Bitty Piggy,” was equally cocky. On the track, Minaj served up witty lines about her newly inked Young Money affiliation and her coveted lifestyle. — Robyn Mowatt 

2010 & Beyond: Pussy Rap isn’t Going anywhere

Pussy rap albums

On Megan Thee Stallion’s Tina Snow, the young rapper takes inspiration from her favorite rapper, Pimp C, trash talking whilst presenting her sexual self. Graphic: @popephoenix for Okayplayer

Azealia Banks — 1991 (2011) 

Despite being only four tracks long, Azealia Banks’ 1991 was a fiery, genre-blending debut EP. The release centers vogue ball culture, but it also carved out space for Banks to fully flesh out her expansive imagination. Her brashness is heard especially on “212.” On the breakout single, the Harlem-bred MC shells out bars in a manner that was unheard of at the time. “What you gon do when I appear?” It’s almost as if she knew the industry was waiting for a lyricst like her. “Liquorice” is an equally satisfying cut, over an uptempo beat, Banks unveils a series of quick-paced lyrics. 1991 didn’t just prove Azealia’s versatility, it also positioned her as the latest female rapper in the game to confidently embrace her sexuality. — RM

Cardi B — Invasion Of Privacy (2018) 

Invasion of Privacy is an audacious debut album from Bronx rapper Cardi B. Throughout the impressive release, Cardi leaves no questions about her reign as one of rap’s biggest names. “She Bad” and “I Do,” are explicit, sex-centric cuts that depict Cardi’s aggressive personality. “Drip,” a track with Migos that leans heavily in the Southern hip-hop space, features Cardi as an animated MC. On “Bickenhead,” she unleashes a slew of cocky rhymes that fare well amid the other self-assertive cuts on the extensive album. Invasion of Privacy was her unapologetic re-introduction to the music industry following her attention-getting mixtape releases. — RM

City Girls — Period (2018) 

The City Girls’ brand of hip-hop is raunchy, aggressive and in your face. Period succeeded in pushing the Miami-bred duo to the forefront of the female hip-hop game. But, it also presented their take on broke men, their sexual prowess, and the city that made them. Both Yung Miami and JT dutifully unveiled harsh rhymes about rich suitors and their glamorous lives. The energy on “Millionaire Dick” is infectious, on it both rappers waste no time driving the point home that they’re all about money. “How To Pimp A N**ga,” another memorable cut, works due to the energy JT and Yung Miami bring to the track. For good reason, City Girls’ mixtape Period is an irreversible staple in the female rap canon. — RM

Megan Thee Stallion — Tina Snow (2018) 

On Megan Thee Stallion’s Tina Snow we witness her effortlessly take on the persona of her alter ego, Tina Montana. Before she released this project she’d already garnered traction with her viral freestyles that showcased her signature Southern cadence and flow. Taking inspiration from her favorite rapper, Pimp C, Megan trash talks whilst presenting her sexual self. “Big Ole Freak,” is a sultry, sex positive standout. “Freak Nasty,” is a quick-paced, assertive cut packed with a gamut of punchlines. When she exclaims “Rich bitch pussy only comes for a check,” it’s clear she is embracing the roots of her Southern predecessor Trina.  — RM

Doja Cat — Hot Pink (2019) 

Doja Cat’S strengths are her ability to shapeshift and shell out vibrant, exploratory and an overt mashup of pop, hip-hop and R&B. Pink Print, her sophomore album, is as charming as it is unique. Throughout it Doja Cat relishes in the kaleidoscope of sounds that she’s become known for creating. On“Juicy,” a single that exploded on the Internet, Doja Cat parallels her wordplay alongside an exquisitely produced beat. Elsewhere on “Streets,” she thrives lyrically as a bass heavy beat rings off, her vocals are exploratory but strong on this Billboard chart-topping single. — RM

__

Banner Graphic: Graphic: @popephoenix for Okayplayer

Created by Mikeisha Vaughn, Pussy Rap & All of That centers women and the queer community in hip-hop. Past guests have included Misa Hylton, Madison Star, Yung Baby Tate, Ken The Man, Donmonique, Miss Pvssy, Erica Banks and more. Follow them on Twitter and Instagram

Related Posts

Conway The Machine & Trillmatic Drop Visual For ”Draco”

#DXCLUSIVE: Shabaam Sahdeeq Teams With J57 For ‘Precious Stones’ Album

TDE’s Lance Skiiiwalker Nabs Nick Hakim For ‘Lost ‘In The World’ Video

#DXCLUSIVE: Denver’s HunidRack6 Rolls Through With "Mopsticks Chopsticks" Video

Buddie Of Dem Franchize Boyz Passes Away After Cancer Battle

Lil Durk’s Cousin & Chicago Rapper Lil Mister Shot & Killed