Tag : writing

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Kid Cudi Said My Writing is Worthless, So I Wrote About It

It's Friday night. I'm sitting in a circle  friends discussing the comments Kid Cudi made surrounding the state hip-hop. (What do you do with your Friday nights?) A few hours earlier, I wrote an article on the subject that wouldn’t be published until Monday, and I decided to pre-trial my opinion.

As much as I thought about what I had written, not once did I believe the article would reach Kid Cudi, and it was almost unimaginable that he'd respond. He’s pretty famous, million-plus followers on Twitter, and probably a plate full business to deal with to start the week.

Fast forward to Monday, the article is out and I’m on the way to my parent's house to give my mom a ride up the street. I check my phone and notice a Twitter notification with a mention from Kid Cudi. Admittedly, I’m excited; he’s acknowledging the article and potentially has something to say.

My excitement turned to a surreal shock when I read the message: 

Kid Cudi Said My Writing is Worthless, So I Wrote About It

I didn’t know what to say. Do I hit him with a meme? A gif? If there's a protocol here, I don't know it. I decided to be respectful and say, “I disagree, but thank you for sharing your 'opinion'.”

I RT’d his comment, so immediately, my followers are beginning to lose their shit. For some reason, I thought that would be the end our conversation.

To my surprise, Scott had more to say. “Like I said, your words hold no weight here. Not anywhere on this planet. Know this about yourself,” he tweeted.

When it comes to my craft, I’ve never been so disrespected. Kid Cudi wrote that. Kid Cudi. The voice all the lonely, depressed and outcast kids told me I’m worthless. This is the same guy that made A Kid Name Cudi and Man on the Moon, two tapes that I held dear because their impact during my high school years. I watched his come up, cheered for his success, and supported his releases.

What was I supposed to say? I honestly had no idea.

Before walking out the door I replied, “Words are my medium. So again, I completely disagree. I’ll continue to use them to get my point across.

I RT’d his second message before getting on the road. My phone is face down, shaking enough to be diagnosed with Parkinson's. Twitter is going crazy, my text messages are filling up, but mom is in the passenger and would have a heart attack if I attempted to text and drive. My mind is racing faster than the traffic, trying to comprehend why he was so obviously irate. Maybe I wouldn’t have been shocked if the piece was slanderous; an attempt to get a rise out him for pageviews, but that wasn’t the case. I was sincere in my rebuttal, and yet my thoughts were met with belittlement and utter disrespect.

By the time I had dropped f my mom, Cudi had deleted the tweets. I can only guess this wasn’t the “message” he wants hip-hop to receive.

Well, I heard it loud and clear. 

His message is that my words are meaningless. His message is that his fame makes him omnipotent and his opinion shouldn’t be questioned by a “sideline nigga.” I was such a fan his come up story, but that was when I was a just a listener and he was just an artist. Now I feel like his music is ruined for me. I can’t separate the man from the musician; he just took a giant shit on my art form, my self-expression.   

I’ve always been pretty fearless with what I choose to write, my fingers are moved by passion, not by name or stature. Now, though, I see how a reaction like this can change a writer's outlook. Especially in the age social media, when the barriers between writer and artist are so small (case in point), writers can prit by getting on the artist's good side, keeping them in a positive light, and reaping the benefits. I couldn’t do it, not without feeling dirty and vile. I’m not for sale, no amount RTs or pageviews can change that.

The relationship rappers have with writers has been more like a dysfunctional marriage for a long time. The closer a writer and rapper are the more they will love you when the words are in their favor, but the moment you write something displeasing, it’s a sign disloyalty. You become a Brutus, and they react accordingly.

After reading articles like, “Irate Rappers Give Journalists A Combat Beat” and “Mad Rappers: Wale, Complex and the History Violence in Hip-Hop Journalism,” it gave me a glimpse at how unpredictable the publishing a story can be. This was before social media and before artists could email in all-caps and send out their frustrations. We see more dialogue now because the digital platforms that connect us, but a few petty words on Twitter are nothing compared to having an irate rapper in your face, challenging you on your perspective, or beating you for it. This was certainly not that.

But who wants to feel like their opinion is being held at gunpoint? As a writer, you’re cheating yourself and your readers if you decide to be biased for the sake relationships and comfortability. If a piece is written without being disrespectful to the artist's craft, that artist doesn't have to agree, but they do have to respect the writer's craft the same.

I understand that trolls exist and artists could be on edge because how much negativity they receive every day, verbal or otherwise. Same with bloggers who will write pieces to ruffle feathers in hopes a traffic increase; they’re playing in oil while smoking cigarettes. Honestly, not every submission will be met with acclaim, not every review will be five mics and not every thought piece will shine your shit and pamper your ideals. But in the current climate integrity is being strangled; the pressure saying something honest with potential backlash, and saying something outlandish for the hope backlash, will only continue adding issues upon the issues.

As I told Kid Cudi, my words are my medium, and I’ll continue to use them to get my point across. No one is here to stroke egos or babysit feelings; we are here to deliver our perspectives and further discussions that surround the genre and culture that we love so much. 

My only vow to rappers and readers is that my mind is open, my ears are open, and my words are honest. No tweet, amount money or famous relationship will change that, and I know my fellow DJBooth brethren all carry the same sentiment.

By Yoh, AKA I’m G.O.O.D., aka @Yoh31

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It Is Not Okay to Listen to Accused Serial Rapist R. Kelly

June 14, 2008, Robert Kelly shudders a sigh relief and walks out a Cook County courthouse a free man, cleared multiple child pornography charges in a trial that lasted six years. Look at him, armored in an expensive suit carefully chosen for the way its deep blue threads convey a calm and assertive innocence, look at him waving to supporters, one whom tells a reporter, "I just wish they leave the Kells alone." His face is the face a man who had his invincibility challenged and then reaffirmed, a man who would emerge from his trial by fire not only unscathed but strengthened. 

Now stop looking at Robert Kelly because Robert Kelly is a rich and powerful man and rich and powerful men can command our attention any time they choose. Instead, let your mind's eye wander over that linoleum drenched courthouse and into the city Chicago, into the home the girl who was on the tape that brought Robert Kelly to trial, the girl who at 14-years-old was raped and then had the videotape her rape played and replayed and analyzed and dissected, brutal frame by brutal frame, for a jury disbelieving strangers. Don't look away because she is not a rich and powerful man, and those who are not rich and powerful men rarely receive our attention. If only for a moment, give her your attention. 

It's been some thirteen years now since R. Kelly was first charged with child pornography possession, and since his acquittal we've settled into a drudgingly predictable pattern in which every few years the spotlight fades and then brightens again on the "stomach-churning" sexual assault allegations R. Kelly has faced, after which we see a wave intellectualized articles about separating great art from the sometimes terrible people who make great art, after which absolutely nothing happens, largely because the media's insistence on reframing R. Kelly's alleged systematic, repeated rape children as a question about art. 

"Is It Okay to Listen to R. Kelly?" asked Vulture in a recent article, making sure to credit him as a "musical genius" first and foremost before writing that he's been accused "awful things." And when we do that, when we insist on including R. Kelly's genius and music into our thinking about the things R. Kelly has been accused , it gives us a welcome escape hatch, it allows our attention to shift away from the path human devastation R. Kelly has left in his wake, away from the very real damage done to very real human beings, and into the land ideas and intellectual debate and cultural analysis, a land where it's far easier to continue to support R. Kelly because is it okay to listen to R. Kelly? If it's even a question it must be.

Ignorance is an excuse, although the weakest one, and one I know well. For years I gleefully bought and memorized R. Kelly albums, turned up the "Ignition (Remix)" when it came on the radio, wrote multiple articles about "Trapped in the Closet" alone. I knew Kelly had been charged with a sex crime, but in my mind, that trial had largely been reduced to a Chappelle Show skit, a reduction which conveniently allowed me to freely laugh at "Sex Kitchen." I'm now ashamed to admit that it never once crossed my mind that there was a child, an actual child with a name and a family and a favorite TV show, at the center those charges. And then, about two years ago, I actually took the time to read the "stomach-churning" sexual assault allegations against Kelly and suddenly I saw the very real children involved and I saw their parents putting on a brave face for their children but crying behind closed doors and I saw Kelly, unrepentant and untouched, and I was nauseated. So since that day I haven't listened to a single R. Kelly song or watched a single R. Kelly video or written a single word about R. Kelly, until now, because knowing what I now knew, how could it possibly be okay to listen to R. Kelly?

The litany allegations against Kelly, a litany that extends far beyond his one well-publicized trial, aren't classified, aren't hidden, many them are matters public record and easily accessed by anyone willing to look for them. So I have looked for them, because the stories young black women rarely demand our attention, particularly when placed against the stories rich and powerful men. Here are those stories...      

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  • Kelly met Aaliyah when she was 12-years-old and then married her when she was 15, he was 28 at the time. He falsified marriage documents stating that she was 18, the marriage was later annulled and Aaliyah signed an NDA nondisclosure agreement] preventing her from speaking about Kelly and their relationship. Barry Hankerson, Aaliyah's uncle and Kelly's then manager, writes a letter to Kelly's attorney in an attempt to get Kelly psychiatric help for his "compulsion to pursue underage girls." 
It Is Not Okay to Listen to Accused Serial Rapist R. Kelly
  • Tiffany Hawkins sues Kelly, alleging that beginning when she was 15-years-old he repeatedly had group sex with her and other underage girls.
  • Patrice Jones sues Kelly, alleging that beginning when she was 16-years-old Kelly had sex with her repeatedly, impregnated her at 17 and then forced her to have an abortion. According to Jones' lawyer, "That abortion haunts her to this day. She’s under psychological care now. It’s changed her life.” 
  • Tracy Sampson sues Kelly, alleging that Kelly began having sex with her when she was a 17-year-old intern at Epic Records and that Kelly impregnated her. 
  • Chicago prosecutors charge Kelly with 21 counts child pornography centered around a tape that purportedly shows Kelly having sex with, and urinating on, his goddaughter, who was 14-years-old at the time. According to Jim DeRogatis, the Chicago-Sun Times reporter who covered the trial and wrote several stories investigating Kelly's alleged abuses, "You watch the video for which he was indicted and there is the disembodied look the rape victim. He orders her to call him Daddy. He urinates in her mouth and instructs her at great length on how to position herself to receive his 'gift.' It's a rape that you're watching." Kelly is acquitted after his attorneys successfully argue that the tape could have been manipulated to make the man in it look like Kelly.
It Is Not Okay to Listen to Accused Serial Rapist R. Kelly
  • During the trial, Lisa Van Allen testifies that she began having sex with Kelly when she was 17-years-old and had participated in group sex along with the 14-year-old girl in the tape. In her testimony, Allen also says that she once broke down crying during a taped sexual encounter and Kelly became angry because the footage was now useless. “He couldn’t watch that, he couldn’t do anything with that,” she said.  
  • Kelly is arrested in Miami on 16 additional charges child pornography, authorities claim they found multiple photos nude, underage girls and photos Kelly "involved in sexual conduct with the female minor" while searching his residence. The charges are dismissed because the search warrant was deemed to be invalid.
  • An unnamed young woman alleges in a more than one-hundred page lawsuit that when she was 14-years-old Kelly discovered her at a Chicago school, Kenwood Academy, and began to have sex with her along with other underage girls he recruited from the school, giving them sneakers and other gifts. She says she's "scarred" by the experience and later attempts to kill herself by slitting her wrists.
  • In 2004 another sex tape leaks and the woman in that tape, Deleon Richards, says that she began having sex with Kelly a decade earlier when she was a teenager.
  • According to DeRogatis, there have been "Dozens girls - not one, not two, dozens - with harrowing lawsuits," all which have been settled by Kelly. DeRogatis also recounts that he also routinely fields calls from other women who say they can't sleep because they're haunted by Kelly's sexual abuse them as a teenager. It's important to note that all the examples above, dozens examples, only include women who went as far as filing lawsuits against Kelly. There are also reportedly several other examples in which Kelly settled with women before a lawsuit was filed, and droves other women allegedly abused by Kelly who never pursued any action against him. For example, a woman told the Chicago Sun-Times that Kelly began having sex with her when she was 17 after they met at a video shoot, another said she was involved in group sex along Hawkins, another said she was one the other girls from Kenwood Academy whom Kelly routinely had sex with, and Chicago area police twice investigated Kelly for completely separate incidents than the incident he was eventually charged for, but dropped those charges when the women declined to press charges. 
  • Kelly's longtime publicist, Regina Daniels, abruptly quit saying that Kelly has "crossed a line" by having sex with their then college-age daughter, who Kelly had known since she was seven.  
  • Kelly’s brother, Carey Kelly, alleges that Kelly attempted to get him to say he was the one in the sex tape, which he refused to do. He also alleges that he was routinely asked to find girls who "looked underage" at Kelly's shows and get their phone numbers.  
  • Demetrius Smith, Kelly’s longtime friend and personal assistant, publishes a memoir, The Man Behind the Man, in which he writes that: “Underage girls had proven to be Kelly’s] weakness. He was obsessed. Sickly addicted."

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When we read about R. Kelly's career and the allegations surrounding him we ten see words like "complicated" thrown around, except there's nothing complicated about our relationship to R. Kelly's continuing career at all. It's exceedingly straightforward, at least once you've seen the full scope and horrific weight the sum allegations brought against him. You can choose to believe that those dozens women, Tiffany Hawkins and Patrice Jones and Tracy Sampson and Lisa Van Allen and Deleon Richards and the girl who slit her wrists in a failed attempt to kill herself and all the broken, anonymous women who never sued and have called Jim DeRogatis simply because they need someone who will believe them, are all liars, all them, in which case you can listen to Kelly's music without burden. Or you have to believe that R. Kelly is a serial rapist who routinely preys on children. It really is that uncomplicated, there is no gray area, no middle ground, no haze. And if you believe that R. Kelly has done nauseatingly terrible things to children and you still choose to buy his albums and attend his concerts and listen to his music, then you're choosing to support a serial rapist. It's exceedingly straightforward. 

The complication comes not with R. Kelly himself but with our own lives. None us have any actual relationship with Robert Sylvester Kelly, and so it would be strikingly easy to cut him from our lives, except through his music he's permanently embedded into our most valued possession, our memories. We hear "I Believe I Can Fly" and think about Space Jam and remember our childhoods, we hear "I'm A Flirt" and remember how impossibly good our freshmen year crush looked that night at that house party, we hear "Happy People" and remember dancing with our aunt at our cousin's wedding and what his music means to us because it was playing while we were with the people who mean something to us and in the places that mean something to us. I remember driving down Harvard Ave. one November night, parking and then literally running into my friend's apartment to tell her about this incredibly strange and amazing....song?...they'd just played on the radio, "Trapped in the Closet." Of all the thousands hours my life I've forgotten, I still remember that hour. Our memories are sacred spaces, and so, course, we fight to protect them, wrap them in layer after layer denial and intentional ignorance if necessary to keep them pure and untarnished by the ten crushing truths we learn later. 

And so we tell ourselves that R. Kelly has never been convicted in court as if we truly believe that the justice system is a perfect reflection actual guilt and innocence. And so with each allegation, we concoct an explanation, most likely one provided by Kelly for us until the sheer volume allegations and explanations defy any logic. And so we tell ourselves that R. Kelly is a genius, detour into intellectual debates about the lines between the art and an artist's personal life as if any amount genius can be equivalent to the pain a raped child. As if you would ever look one those abused women in the eyes, women who could be your daughter or sister or mother or friend, and say, "But he makes great music." We all perform these mental contortions to avoid confronting hard truths so we can continue to live our lives in comfort, especially out fear being guilty by association, myself included in more ways than I can count, but here, in this specific case, with all these dozens  women who have said Kelly abused them, it really shouldn't be that difficult to place their pain in front our own entertainment. 

Shattering the sanctity our musical memories, our heroes, is a painful, difficult business, but I've found one force stronger than even our resistance to change - compassion. It's easy to ignore the allegations against Kelly when they're presented as ideas, a thing to be debated and thought about and questioned, it's nearly impossible to ignore them when you see those women as real, actual humans. As I write this my two daughters are sleeping and it's not hard to imagine them in the place Tiffany Hawkins and Patrice Jones, those fears come quick and devastatingly sharp to parents. I imagine them telling me they were raped, I imagine finding them with their wrists slit. I imagine them telling me who raped them, and then I imagine that man walking free out a courtroom, shuddering a sigh relief armored in an expensive suit carefully chosen for the way its deep blue threads convey a calm and assertive innocence. I imagine that man going on to gather fame and adoration and money and it's not hard to imagine because I know it's some father's reality and now I'm on the verge tears and deciding that I'll sleep in my daughter's room tonight so I can know she's protected and safe. 

If I could make you see their face when you look at Kelly, if I could make you hear their voice instead Kelly's when you listen to his music, I would, because they're all I see and hear now, and if their names are one day more well known than his, then there might be something like justice.

It is not okay to listen to R. Kelly.

Like this article? DJBooth is committed to quality music journalism, never clickbait. You can join us by downloading our app or following us on Facebook or Twitter.

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Tyrese Appears To Heavily Clown XXXTENTACION

Although XXXTENTACION’s face tattoos were noticeably absent, it still appears that actor/model Tyrese took to Instagram to clown the polarizing rapper, citing him as an example for why he doesn’t use drugs.

“When you look in the mirror after drinking and smoking and popping every pill they tell you to pop from these hip hop songs,” he wrote on Saturday morning (September 20). “My whole life I’ve proudly always said #NoToDrugs.”

The photo strongly resembles the Broward County, Florida native, who recently shaved f his eyebrows and dyed his signature dreads grey. One commenter chided the Fast & Furious star for “bullying,” writing, “This is Bullying.. if u think this man is on drugs u should reach out privately to help him. Not publicly try to embarrass him. At the end the day this is someone’s child.”

Others applauded him for even broaching the topic drugs in Hip Hop.

“i usually don’t agree with your rants but im grateful you were man enough to say something about the current state hip hop,” one Instagram user wrote. “God knows somebody needs too. Thank you @tyrese.”

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Read Future's Heartbreaking Tribute To Late Sound Engineer Seth Firkins

Seth Firkins, a sound engineer who’d been working with rappers on the Atlanta scene for years, passed away in his sleep on September 23.

Firkins was especially close to Future, and had worked as the engineer on the rapper’s 2012 Pluto 3D album. Some other major credits include American Gangster by JAY-Z and The Appeal: Georgia’s Most Wanted by Gucci Mane. He also worked with Young Thug, Rihanna, Ciara and Trina.

Future shared a touching response on social media, writing a lengthy Instagram caption to celebrate the life his friend.

“I always gave racism a cold shoulder because my real brother Is a white guy by the name Seth Firkins,” he wrote. “I got a call saying u died in your sleep? First thing came to my mind is, why are you sleep at 5am? That’s when we record our best shit & I tell u ‘don’t’ fall asleep we got more work to do.. but somethin told me I should’ve been at home recording for some reason.”

“I was saying this in my head, then bad news beat me home! I love u beyond this post, I will cherish u forever big bro, I just wish u would’ve text me & told me u was going to sleep and i wasn’t going to be able to wake u up this time…the family will miss u 1000%!! No kap in my game kid, rest well my brother. Rest well.”

Future wasn’t the only one to pay his respects to Firkins, who passed away the age 36. Other Hip Hop producers and sound engineers, such as Mike WiLL Made It and Alex Tumay shared their grief, with Tumay saying “the world is going to sound so much worse without him.”

No cause death has been reported.

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RZA: Wu-Tang Clan Missed Opportunity To Remix Drake's "Wu-Tang Forever"

RZA has told Power 106 Los Angeles that a Wu-Tang Clan remix Drake’s “Wu-Tang Forever” is probably never going to happen. Admitting that Drake pretty much threw them an “alley-oop” by writing the song, he now feels like the opportunity has been “missed.”

Asked whether a Wu-Tang remix the track, which featured on Drake’s 2013 album Nothing Was The Same, was in the pipeline, RZA said, “That should have happened. First all I just want to shout Drake out, I think he threw an alley-oop to us right there.”

“I think we missed it,” he continued. When one the show’s hosts told him she thought it was “never too late,” RZA remained unconvinced. “I gotta say we missed it. I don’t regret it for no popularity or nothing, I just regret it for the fact that, yo, as you become an elder, it’s your duty to go back and work with youth and rekindle that fire.”

RZA shared stories artists like Isaac Hayes and Quincy Jones reaching out to help him, and said, “When somebody like Drake reaches out to Wu-Tang and says ‘Yo, let’s collaborate,’ it’s more our duty, forget the business. We gon’ make money regardless.”

The rapper/producer/actor revealed that he employed this policy with Joey Bada$$, recording songs with the 22-year-old and his crew, saying, “I recorded four songs with them … let ’em drop their acids on my studio floor. Let ’em smoke their blunts and drop their acids. My maid had to come and take care that.”

Watch the full interview below:

RZA has spoken about Drake’s “Wu-Tang Forever” previously. The track samples “It’s Yourz” from the group’s Wu-Tang Forever album, and RZA personally allowed Drizzy to use the sample free charge.

“I appreciate it,” RZA said. “He sent me the song because they couldn’t clear the sample. So I did it myself, personally, for free. Free charge. Because to me, that’s what we meant when we said, ‘Wu-Tang is forever,’” he told Rolling Stone in 2013. “We didn’t think we were going to live forever. We meant that the energy what we do would spread on in culture, generation by generation.”

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Fergie Returns With "Double Dutchess" LP Featuring Rick Ross, Nicki Minaj & YG

Black Eyed Peas vet Fergie has returned with a sequel to her 2006 solo album, The Dutchess. Titled Double Dutchess, the album is an emotionally charged, 13-track roller coaster and features contributions from Rick Ross, Nicki Minaj and YG (but, notably, no listed features from any the Peas).

Throughout the project, she explores love, her recently dissolved marriage to actor Josh Duhamel and subsequent reinvention as a 42-year-old single mother.

“I think it was important to make honest songs — not only ones that are fun and Hip Hop, or a fun dance pop song or a reggae song,” Fergie said in a recent interview with Marie Claire. “This is my time and place to get into those crevices what’s going on inside. I’ve been through a lot in my life so that’s where I go. My therapy is writing it down and journaling. This is the time not only to express it lyrically, but melodically and visually.”

The “M.I.L.F. $” singer accompanied the release with a visual experience, which depicts an assorted collection various looks Fergie has adopted over the years.

More than 10 different celebrities also make an appearance in the visual, including Kendall Jenner, Chelsea Handler, Kelly Osbourne, Chrissy Teigen, and Kim Kardashian, who also stars in her “M.I.L.F.$” video.

Check out the album stream, cover art and tracklist below.

Fergie Returns With "Double Dutchess" LP Featuring Rick Ross, Nicki Minaj & YG

  1. Hungry f. Rick Ross
  2. Like It Ain’t Nuttin’
  3. You Already Know f. Nicki Minaj
  4. Just Like You
  5. A Little Work
  6. Life Goes On
  7. M.I.L.F. $
  8. Save It Til Morning
  9. Enchanté (Carine) f. Axl Jack
  10. Tension
  11. L.A. LOVE (la la) f. YG
  12. Love Is Blind
  13. Love Is Pain
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Tchami and Malaa team up for 11-stop 'No Redemption' North American tour

Undoubtedly leading the current revival  French house tastemaking comes two producers who are quite literally writing the trends in deep pulsating, bass forward house music. Today  took to Twitter today to announce to fans the “No Redemption” North American tour alongside enigmatic house producer and fellow CONFESSION confidant,  to cap f 2017.

The 11-city roll out will grace major Canadian markets Toronto and Montreal, while crossing the U.S. with the remainder stops — with Las Vegas, Brooklyn, Miami and Chicago in the duo’s crosshairs. The “No Redemption” road stretch is pairing the dark, deep, and wildly unpredictable turns Malaa with the symbolic religious sacraments Tchami as he takes his constituents to church.

Pre-sale tickets are  using the code “SUMMER99.”

Tchami and Malaa team up for 11-stop 'No Redemption' North American tour[hupso]
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Reigning Formula 1 world champion Lewis Hamilton is working on new music with Frank Ocean – Dancing Astronaut

Three-time F1 world champion Lewis Hamilton is on a roll, after winning a manic Singapore GP which saw him take the lead in the overall drivers’ standings, break motorsport legend Michael Schumacher’s record for the most number pole positions in the process.

It also seems that the veteran driver isn’t just making major waves in the motorsport industry, as the multi-talented Mercedes AMG driver appears to be working on new music, with rumors him releasing a track with  circling.

According to compatriot , “I’ve heard people talking about Lewis’s music and apparently he is quite good. I would love to hear his stuff. I know he writes it. There has been a lot talk on what he’s been up to and I know he’s been writing music with Frank Ocean. I think that’ll come out at some point.”

All that remains to be seen is how the monster collaboration will pan out in the future.

Reigning Formula 1 world champion Lewis Hamilton is working on new music with Frank Ocean - Dancing Astronaut[hupso]
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Drake Gets Tattoo Tributes To Fallen Friend Fif & Denzel Washington

Tattoo artist Inal Bersekov has shared photos Drake’s two latest tattoos to Instagram — one a tribute to Drizzy’s late friend Fif, the other a portrait Denzel Washington.

Fif, a 33-year-old affiliate Drake’s OVO Sound record label, died last week after reportedly being shot in Toronto. Drake shared a photo his late friend on Instagram, later using that same photo as the basis for his tattoo. Above the tattoo is the inscription “Forever Fif.”

Bersekov, whose B.R.O. Studio is based in Belgium, wrote on Instagram that he was “honored to pay tribute tattooing “FIF” on my brother Drake].”

Drake’s second tat the week is a portrait iconic actor Denzel Washington as fictional jazz trumpeter Bleek Gilliam from Spike Lee’s 1990 movie Mo’ Better Blues.

About this one, Bersekov wrote “Mo’ better blues” first session on my brother Drake] , thanks as usual for your trust.” Bersekov then references a quote from the movie, writing  “‘Clarke: ‘Cause mo better makes it mo better.'”

According to Pop Star Tats, Drake now has 30 tattoos. His ink already includes tributes to his father, Lil Wayne, late R&B princess Aaliyah, as well as a matching shark tattoo he shares with ex-girlfriend Rihanna.

[hupso]