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Drake Says His “Real Fear” Came to Life in Manchester

The idea that an experience as pure and carefree as attending a concert could be shaken by the unforgiving atrocities terrorists any kind is a sickening notion, and just yesterday (May 22) that notion was felt all over again in Manchester.

According to the latest reports, two suicide bombs were detonated outside the Manchester venue where Ariana Grande was performing, killing 22 and injuring dozens more. While the world collectively reels over yet another terrorist attack at a concert, those in the entertainment industry are once again seeing their worst nightmare realized.

Drake, who frequently tours Europe and has built quite a relationship with his UK-based peers specifically, took to his Instagram early this morning (May 23) to explain that what happened in Manchester was a very “real fear” for him and his team during the course his most recent European stint.

Drake’s comments aren’t just kind words empathy, but rather, they point to the very real dread that a large number artists and fans have experienced over the past few years.

I recently watched the Eagles Death Metal HBO documentary Nos Amis, chronicling the horrendous terrorist attack that took place during their show in Paris in November 2015, leaving 90 dead and hundreds more scarred both mentally and physically. Having seen the effect that this attack had on the artists themselves—the fear playing again, the feeling responsibility, the “survivor’s guilt”—I know that Drake is in no way embellishing when discussing this fear. It’s a fear likely shared by every artist touring abroad, one those “back your mind” fears that never fully leaves no matter how many security checkpoints or police ficers are present.

While the impact this latest attack will have on acts looking to tour in Europe is so nuanced it’s likely going to require a separate piece, suffice it to say that artists like Drake who have amassed large, dedicated fan bases overseas are seriously re-thinking their strategies for addressing those fans in a live setting.

Life is fragile, and music has been one the greatest tools developed by humans to cope with that fragility. It’s absolutely crushing that people can no longer see their favorite artists live without—on some level—fearing for their safety.

As both a contributor to and a fan musical culture, I have to believe we can persist through the hatred and fear and continue to use music as the unique, amazing, unifying and healing tool that it is.

Like this article? DJBooth is committed to quality music journalism, never clickbait. You can join us by downloading our app or following us on Facebook or Twitter.

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Drake Shares Tribute To Canadian Singer Gord Downie

Canada is mourning the loss rock icon Gord Downie — the face and voice Canadian hall--fame band The Tragically Hip. Downie passed away Wednesday (October 18) from an aggressive and incurable form brain cancer called glioblastoma.

Along with countless others, including Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Toronto-born rapper Drake shared a tribute to the rocker his Instagram account.

“Rest In Peace legend … you will be forever treasured by this country and missed by the world,” he wrote in the caption the photo. The image was taken during the May 5 Toronto Raptors playf loss to the Cleveland Cavaliers when Downie approached Drizzy during half-time.

Public Enemy front-man Chuck D also paid respect to Downie on Twitter, which was met with respect and admiration from many Canadian fans.

Downie was diagnosed back in 2015 after suffering a seizure. The Tragically Hip then embarked on a final tour, which ended with an epic sold-out final concert in their hometown Kingston, Ontario.

“Gord knew this day was coming – his response was to spend this precious time as he always had – making music, making memories and expressing deep gratitude to his family and friends for a life well lived,” read an ficial the statement on the band’s website.

Embed from Getty s

HipHopDX sends condolences to Gord Downie’s family, friends and fans.

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Post Malone Responds To "Rockstar" Chart Controversy

Post Malone has addressed the questions about the authenticity his first #1 song on the Billboard Hot 100. After multiple reports noted how a loop video for “Rockstar” on YouTube may have been used to game the system, Malone fired back by dismissing the controversy — specifically targeting a tweet and article by SPIN.

“Well the song is good so probably not the only reason why,” he tweeted on Tuesday (October 17) in response to SPIN tweet about the loop video.

Malone also expressed frustration with the doubt surrounding his 21 Savage-assisted single’s success.

“Whenever you live your dreams everyone wants to try to take it away from you,” he wrote later on Tuesday.

Republic Records, Malone’s label and the party that uploaded the video in question, hasn’t issued any statement or comment on the controversy.

(The original version this article was published on October 18, 2017 and can found below.)

Post Malone is allegedly reaping the benefits a curious YouTube video uploaded by his label, Republic Records, last month. According to The FADER, Republic may have used a loophole in order to help Malone’s new single reach #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The labeling the video would lead a viewer to believe it’s the full song for his 21 Savage-assisted record, “Rockstar.” Instead, the video is a loop the chorus featured on the song. 21 Savage’s verse is absent from the audio.

Additionally, the description the video reads “FULL SONG HERE,” and includes a link to the various streaming options for the song.

As Wednesday (October 18), a view count for the YouTube video stands at over 44 million. The comments for the YouTube video have been disabled.

It’s currently unclear just how big a role the video loop played in “Rockstar” obtaining the #1 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 chart this past week. In a statement to Genius, Billboard said, “U.S. streams for that clip do contribute to our songs charts, the same way an instrumental track or a remix a song would count towards the main song’s placement if downloaded or streamed.”

Regardless, the song is a bonafide hit, and has been topping the daily Spotify charts for more than a week with millions plays.

But Republic’s video has caught even more attention given that YouTube streams will reportedly soon be taken into consideration for the Billboard 200 albums chart.

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Paul Kalkbrenner to debut 'Back to the Future' live show in LA – Dancing Astronaut

Over the past two decades, dance music pioneer  has become one electronic music’s bonafide superstars, filling arenas with his live shows and headlining major festival’s worldwide. On Friday, November 3rd, the Berlin-based producer will venture to Los Angeles to deliver a singular journey through the history techno.

The live show, titled “Back to the Future,” underscores a previous in which Kalkbrenner personally curated over 5000 underground works in Berlin between 1987 and 1993. The compilation was meant to channel those feelings freedom and abandon that permeated the warehouse parties East Berlin during this seminal period techno.

By proxy, Kalkbrenner’s US debut will showcase the evolution techno and rave culture throughout the late 80s and early 90s. “Back to the Future” marks a rare chance to witness one electronic music’s true pioneers in an intimate setting, and become exposed to the music that shaped not only Berlin’s club culture, but the global techno landscape.

Paul Kalkbrenner to debut 'Back to the Future' live show in LA - Dancing Astronaut

Paul Kalkbrenner to debut 'Back to the Future' live show in LA - Dancing Astronaut[hupso]
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Stevie Crooks – This Feels Right | Hip Hop Songs

More from Stevie Crooks

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Young Dolph Is Selling Bulletproof Flak Jackets To Promote New Album

Young Dolph is revving up his promotional efforts ahead the release his new project, Thinking Out Loud.

The self-described “King Memphis” has unveiled his new line Thinking Out Loud-themed merchandise. It includes an $85 bulletpro flak jacket, a clear nod to last month’s Hollywood shooting incident that left Dolph with multiple gunshot wounds.

Young Dolph Is Selling Bulletpro Flak Jackets To Promote New Album

The jacket comes with a disclaimer that reads, “This item is solely the plate carrier vest, MOLLE plates sold separately.” In other words, the jacket isn’t actually bulletpro.

Elsewhere, Dolph is selling vinyl, cassette tapes and CD copies his new album, as well as Thinking Out Loud-themed t-shirts, hoodies and bandanas.

Dolph’s upcoming LP features 10 tracks with guest appearances from D.R.A.M., Gucci Mane, 2 Chainz and Ty Dolla $ign. On Wednesday (October 18), he also released a new video for the album’s single, “Believe Me,” which was partially filmed during his hospital stay.

To browse Dolph’s full range Thinking Out Loud merchandise, visit the rapper’s ficial store website.

Thinking Out Loud is expected to arrive on Friday (October 20).

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IMS conference talks global digital music explosion in the East

The International Music Summit held a conference to discuss the global digital music explosion in the East on September 21 and 22, specifically the rise streaming and the scale future income as China and Asia fully expand their music markets. The panel consisted five keynote speakers and was moderated by Mark Lawrence who is the CEO the Association for Electronic Music in the United Kingdom.

Five speakers were featured in this edition’s Asia-Pacific conference,  including , a Brazilian DJ, Bart Cools, Warner Music Groups executive vice president in global A&R marketing for dance music, industry executive Eric Reithler-Barros, Jessie Wang, international business director for NetEase Cloud Music in China, and Pyro Music CEO Spencer Tarring.

This specific conference was titled, The Digital Storm, and featured both Western and Eastern input on the booming music industry in China. This trend was reinforced by the China Electronic Music Market report presented on day two by Net Ease Cloud Music, which estimated 2.86 hundred million users electronic music in China in 2017 and confirmed electronic music as the second most preferred genre amongst users in the country.

IMS has completed a successful fourth installment its flagship event, IMS Asia-Pacific. The event, held in conjunction with A2LiVE and the STORM festival, brought together 700 leaders from the dance music industry from 24 countries for two days panels, production and DJ workshops and after parties in Shanghai.

 

H/T:

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Every Hip-Hop Artist With Over 1 Million Monthly Spotify Listeners

In March, Spotify reached the 50 million paid subscriber plateau. Along with their unpaid user base, the most popular streaming platform in the world currently boasts over 100 million active users. Though a vast number hip-hop fans prefer competing subscription services like Apple Music (because its exclusives) and TIDAL (because Jay Z) over Spotify, not to mention free options like Audiomack and SoundCloud, Spotify will likely remain the king the streaming castle for the foreseeable future. 

Spotify owes its success to a number factors, most notably a clean user interface and an expansive music library—save for most Jay Z's catalog, along with Dr. Dre and a handful others—but its music curation, millions playlists and daily updated charts are undoubtedly what has helped the platform grow over time while retaining its user base.

One chart that doesn't exist, though, is a ranked list all artists by monthly listeners, which is one the several metrics, along with total plays and plays by country, that is made available to the public. (It's important to note that neither Apple Music nor TIDAL discloses artist, song or album analytics to their paying customers.)

For several years now, people have been asking Spotify to deliver a chart that provides an up-to-the-minute ranking artists by their total monthly listeners, but to date, they have only fered Top 200 and Viral 50 charts, which users can filter by country and date.

That changes today.

Below you will find a list every hip-hop artist—as well as a number R&B artists whose sound and image are synonymous with hip-hop—that currently has over 1 million monthly listeners on Spotify, along with their top streamed song on the platform.

To make your browsing experience more friendly, we have separated artists into four tiers based on their total monthly listeners: "We Gonna Make It" (1 to 4.9M), "FuckWithMeYouKnowIGotIt" (5 to 9.9M), "Kinda Like a Big Deal" (10 to 19.9M) and, finally, "I Got The Keys" (20M+). 

While running through the list, it's important to keep four things in mind:

1. If your favorite artist doesn't appear, it's because they do not currently (as May 19, 2017) have over 1 million monthly listeners. Upset? Get to streaming.
2. Artists like Jay Z (7.9M), Beyoncé (17.1M) and Dr. Dre (6.2M) have not made their entire catalog available on Spotify because their stakes in competing streaming services. If they did, however, their monthly listener totals would be higher.
3. We're confident we found every single artist that meets our minimum criteria standard—at least 1 million monthly listeners—but there's a strong likelihood we did miss a few artists. We will update accordingly moving forward, we promise.
4. This is a fun exercise. Please keep this in mind as these numbers are constantly updating.

And here we go...

"I Got The Keys" (20M+)

38M        Drake (“One Dance” - 1.2B)
31M        Kendrick Lamar (“HUMBLE.” - 217M)
29M        Nicki Minaj (“Only” - 180M)
28M        The Weeknd (“Can’t Feel My Face” - 703M)
27M        Future (“Low Life” - 271M)
26M        Ty Dolla $ign (“Swalla” - 157M)
25M        Rihanna (“Work” - 674M)
24M        DJ Khaled (“For Free” - 118M)
20M        Kanye West (“FourFiveSeconds” - 380M)
20M        G-Eazy (“Me, Myself & I” - 600M)

"Kinda Like a Big Deal" (10 to 19.9M)

19M        Pitbull (“Timber” - 430M)
17M        Beyonce (“Halo” - 280M)
17M        Eminem (“Lose Yourself” - 351M)
17M        Wiz Khalifa (“See You Again” - 648M)
15M        Lil Wayne (“A Milli” - 105M)
15M        Big Sean (“Bounce Back” - 210M)
15M        Kehlani (“Gangsta” - 82M)
14M        Chris Brown ("Five More Hours" - 326M)
14M        Migos (“Bad and Boujee” - 280M)
13.9M      Post Malone (“White Iverson” - 276M)
13.8M      French Montana (“No Shopping” - 63M)
13.3M      Lil Uzi Vert (“XO Tour Llif3” - 106M)
13.1M      Khalid (“Location” - 154M)
13.0M      KYLE (“iSpy” - 223M)
12.4M      Travis Scott (“Antidote” - 193M)
12.3M      Rae Sremmurd (“Black Beatles” - 383M)
11.7M      Logic (“1-800-273-8255” - 29M)
10.9M      Machine Gun Kelly (“Bad Things” - 247M)
10.5M      J. Cole (“No Role Modelz” - 307M)
10.4M      Gucci Mane (“Both” - 59M)
10.1M      Young Thug (“pick up the phone” - 154M)
10.0M      Kodak Black (“Tunnel Vision” - 109M)
10.0M      Desiigner (“Panda” - 590M)

"FuckWithMeYouKnowIGotIt" (5 to 9.9M)

9.8M        2 Chainz (“Watch Out” - 75M)
9.1M        D.R.A.M. (“Broccoli” - 343M)
9.1M        Wale (“My PYT” - 57M)
8.7M        Snoop Dogg (“Young, Wild & Free” - 298M)
8.7M        Childish Gambino (“Redbone” - 125M)
8.7M        Chance The Rapper (“No Problem” - 172M)
8.5M        Jeremih (“Don’t Tell ‘Em” - 191M)
8.5M        Ne-Yo ("Time Our Lives" - 376M)
8.3M        PARTYNEXTDOOR (“Run Up” - 169M)
8.0M        Notorious B.I.G (“Hypnotize” - 130M)
8.0M        Frank Ocean (“Thinkin Bout You” - 192M)
7.9M        Jay Z (“Niggas in Paris” - 351M)
7.8M        50 Cent (“In Da Club” - 169M)
7.7M        Macklemore & Ryan Lewis (“Thrift Shop” - 358M)
7.5M        Tyga (“Ayo” - 243M)
7.5M        Fetty Wap (“Trap Queen” - 522M)
7.1M        ASAP Rocky (“Fucking Problems” - 244M)
7.1M        Mike WiLL Made-It (“23” - 99M)
7.0M        Outkast (“Hey Ya!” - 214M)
7.0M        Trey Songz ("Slow Motion" - 162M)
6.9M        Bryson Tiller (“Don’t” - 279M)
6.9M        Kid Ink (“Promise” - 103M)
6.8M        Rick Ross (“Purple Lamborghini” - 116M)
6.7M        A Boogie Wit da Hoodie (“My Shit” - 57M)
6.3M        Kid Cudi (“Pursuit Happiness” - 157M)
6.2M        B.o.B (“Airplanes” - 122M)
6.2M        Russ (“What They Want” - 97M)
6.2M        Dr. Dre (“The Next Episode” - 185M)
6.2M        Meek Mill (“All Eyes on You” - 156M)
6.0M        Lil Yachty (“One Night” - 99M)
5.9M        T.I. (“Whatever You Like” - 92M)
5.8M        2Pac (“Ambitionz Az A Ridah” - 83M)
5.8M        Sage The Gemini ("Now and Later" - 155M)
5.7M        Yo Gotti (“Down in the DM” - 100M)
5.7M        ScHoolboy Q (“Man the Year” - 115M)
5.6M        YG (“My N*gga” - 122M) “FDT” doesn’t show up in Popular]
5.6M        Joey Badass (“Devastated” - 75M)
5.5M        21 Savage (“X” - 162M)
5.5M        Mac Miller (“Donald Trump” - 114M)
5.5M        XXXTentacion (“Look At Me!” - 63M)
5.4M        NAV (“Some Way” - 30M)
5.2M        Fat Joe ("All The Way Up" - 105M)
5.1M        Metro Boomin (“X” - 162M)
5.0M        The Game (“100” - 66M)
5.0M        A$AP Ferg (“Work (Remix)” - 99M)
5.0M        Tinie Tempah (“Girls Like” - 168M)

"We Gonna Make It" (1 to 4.9M)

4.8M        Tory Lanez (“LUV” - 159M)
4.8M        Kevin Gates (“2 Phones” - 154M)
4.7M        Busta Rhymes (“Don’t Cha” - 73M)
4.7M        Aminé (“Caroline” - 217M)
4.6M        Lil Jon (“Turn Down For What” - 256M)
4.6M        Madeintyo (“Uber Everywhere” - 109M)
4.6M        T-Pain (“Buy U A Drank” - 74M)
4.2M        DMX (“X Gon Give It To You” - 124M)
4.2M        Lupe Fiasco (“The Show Goes On” - 65M)
4.1M        6LACK (“PRBLMS” - 47M)
4.1M        Stormzy ("Shut Up" - 52M)
4.1M        Juicy J (“Bandz a Make Her Dance” - 55M)
4.1M        Ludacris (“My Chick Bad” - 31M)
4.1M        Playboi Carti (“wokeuplikethis” - 15M)
4.1M        Miguel (“Adorn” - 99M)
4.1M        DJ Mustard ("In My Room" - 110M)
4.0M        Pusha T (“Trouble on My Mind” - 31M)
4.0M        PnB Rock (“Selfish” - 66M)
3.8M        Ayo & Teo ("Rolex" - 62M)
3.8M        Omarion ("Post To Be" - 182M)
3.7M        Rob $tone ("Chill Bill" - 194M)
3.7M        Waka Flocka Flame (“No Hands” - 98M)
3.5M        Roy Woods (“Drama” - 62M)
3.5M        Remy Ma ("All The Way Up" - 105M)
3.4M        will.i.am (“Scream & Shout” - 198M)
3.4M        Diddy (“Ill Be Missing You - 3.4M)
3.4M        Rich Homie Quan (“Flex (Ooh, Ooh, Ooh)” - 161M)
3.3M        Missy Elliott (“Get Your Freak On” - 53M)
3.2M        Tee Grizzley ("First Day Out" - 31M)
3.1M        YFN Lucci (“Key to the Streets” - 36M)
3.1M        ASAP Mob (“Yamborgini High” - 33M)
3.0M        Nas (“If I Ruled The World” - 47M)
3.0M        Ice Cube (“It Was a Good Day” - 90M)
3.0M        O.T. Genasis (“Cut It” - 107M)
3.0M        SZA (“Childs Play” - 28M)
2.9M        Soulja Boy (“Crank That” - 74M)
2.9M        Young Money (“Trophies” - 88M)
2.7M        Jidenna (“Classic Man” - 109M)
2.7M        Jeezy (“Put On” - 54M)
2.7M        N.W.A (“Straight Outta Compton” - 79M)
2.7M        August Alsina ("I Luve This Shit" - 48M)
2.6M        GoldLink (“Crew” - 14M)
2.6M        Jhené Aiko (“The Worst” - 67M)
2.5M        Young M.A ("OOOUUU" - 112M)
2.4M        Ja Rule (“Always on Time” - 42M)
2.4M        Lil Dicky (“Save Dat Money” - 94M)
2.4M        Fabolous (“Into You” - 22M)
2.4M        Young Dolph (“Play Wit Yo Bitch” - 4M)
2.4M        ILoveMakonnen (“Tuesday” - 116M)
2.3M        Big Boi (“Shutterbugg” - 10M)
2.2M        Chief Keef (“Love Sosa” - 51M)
2.1M        Ugly God ("Water" - 54M)
2.1M        Fort Minor (“Remember The Name” - 146M)
2.1M        A Tribe Called Quest (“Can I Kick It?” - 44M)
2.1M        Ying Yang Twins (“Get Low” - 85M)
2.1M        K Camp (“Comfortable” - 55M)
2.0M        DJ Drama (“Wishing” - 44M)
2.0M        Tech N9ne (“Hood Go Crazy” - 33M)
2.0M        Wu-Tang Clan (“C.R.E.A.M.” - 52M)
2.0M        Nebu Kiniza ("Gassed Up" - 53M)
1.9M        Lil' Kim (“Lady Marmalade” - 58M)
1.9M        Vic Mensa (“U Mad” - 33M)
1.8M        Anderson .Paak (“Am I Wrong” - 19M)
1.8M        Lloyd Banks (“You Don’t Know” - 46M)
1.8M        Tyler, The Creator (“Yonkers” - 54M)
1.8M        Dae Dae ("What U Mean" 36M)
1.7M        E-40 (“Choices (Yup)” - 31M)
1.7M        Warren G (“Regulate” - 84M)
1.7M        Denzel Curry (“Ultimate” - 62M)
1.7M        Lloyd ("You" - 23M)
1.6M        The Roots ("The Seed 2.0" - 39M) 
1.6M        Bobby Shmurda (“Hot N*gga” - 134M)
1.6M        Eve (“Let Me Blow Ya Mind” - 59M)
1.6M        Yelawolf (“Till Its Gone” - 54M)
1.6M        Vince Staples (“Norf Norf” - 30M)
1.6M        Action Bronson ("Baby Blue" - 48M)
1.5M        Bone-Thugs-N-Harmony (“Tha Crossroads” - 31M)
1.5M        Mobb Deep (“Shock Ones Pt. II” - 47M)
1.5M        Eazy-E (“Real Muthaphuckin G’s - 22M)
1.5M        Hoodie Allen (“No Interruption” - 52M)
1.5M        Common (“Glory” - 26M)
1.5M        Lil Durk (“Like Me” - 25M)
1.5M        Isaiah Rashad (“Free Lunch” - 12M)
1.5M        Skizzy Mars - ("Do You There" - 15M)
1.5M        dvsn (“Hallucinations” - 26M)
1.5M        BJ The Chicago Kid (“Turnin’ Me Up” - 17M)
1.5M        NF ("Grindin" - 19M)
1.4M        Skepta ("Shutdown" - 35M)
1.4M        Twista (“Slow Jamz” - 20M)
1.4M        Bankroll Fresh (“Walked In” - 46M)
1.4M        Ab-Soul (“Illuminate” - 13M)
1.4M        DeJ Loaf (“Back Up” - 77M)
1.4M        Eric Bellinger ("Valet" - 59M)
1.3M        Mike Stud ("These Days" - 24M)
1.3M        D12 (“My Band” - 27M)
1.3M        Rich Gang (“Lifestyle” - 93M)
1.3M        Method Man (“Da Rockwilder” - 26M)
1.3M        Cam’ron (“Hey Ma” - 33M)
1.3M        Ace Hood (“Bugatti” - 56M)
1.3M        Majid Jordan (“My Love” - 22M)
1.2M        Rich Chigga ("Dat $tick" - 26M)
1.2M        LL Cool J (“Doin It” - 21M)
1.2M        Run The Jewels (“Close Your Eyes (And Count to Fuck)” - 20M)
1.2M        Mos Def (“Ms. Fat Booty” - 35M)
1.2M        Syd (“YOU’RE THE ONE” - 9M)
1.2M        Ray J ("Sexy Can I" - 28M)
1.1M        Three 6 Mafia (“Stay Fly” - 17M)
1.1M        Bow Wow (“Shortie Like Mine” - 15M)
1.1M        Chingy (“Right Thurr” - 25M)
1.1M        Hopsin (“Ill Mind Hopsin 5” - 30M)
1.1M        Earl Sweatshirt (“Chum” - 27M)
1.1M        Lil Pump ("Flex Like Ouu" - 5M)
1.1M        Lecrae ("All I Need Is You" - 15M)
1.0M        Andy Mineo ("You Can't Stop Me" - 25M)
1.0M        Q-Tip (“A Little Party Never Killed Nobody” - 101M)
1.0M        Smino (“blkswn” - 2M)
1.0M        Freddie Gibbs (“Crushed Glass” - 810K)
1.0M        Dave East (“Wrote My Way Out” - 5.4M)
1.0M        Bad Meets Evil (“Lighters” - 57M)
1.0M        Danny Brown (“Grown Up” - 24M)
1.0M        Mick Jenkins (“Jazz” - 15M)
1.0M        Juvenile (“Back That Azz Up” - 22M)
1.0M        Plies (“Ran Off On The Plug Twice” - 21M)

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