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D’Angelo Announces Spring European Tour

D’Angelo is hitting the road. The enigmatic but critically acclaimed singer will be hitting Europe for six dates in Spring 2018. 

Billboard reports the “Brown Sugar” singer will be hitting London at the Eventim Apollo and then Switzerland, Paris, Berlin and Hamburg before concluding at the DR Koncerthuset in Copenhagen in March 2018.

Black Messiah, with The Vanguard, was D’Angelo’s last proper studio album, released in 2014.

Check out the dates below.

March 6 — Eventim Apollo, London, England
March 8 — Volkhaus, Zurich, Switzerland
March 9 — Le Salle Pleyel, Paris, France
March 4 — The Docks, Hamburg, Germany
March 15 — Columbiahalle, Berlin, Germany
March 17 — DR Koncerthuset, Copenhagen, Denmark

Photo: press handout

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Ford Miskin – Do It Better ft. Theophilus London | Hip Hop Songs

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Bahamadia’s Phone-Produced “Dialed Up 2” Project Is Off The Hook

Philadelphia, PA – Since stepping out with her critically acclaimed debut, Kollage, in 1996, Philly native Bahamadia has established herself among the upper echelon  Hip Hop artists. From her work with the celebrated Lyricist Lounge series to collaborations with The Roots, the late Guru and Erykah Badu, she’s been a bright spot for female MCs.

Serving as the sequel to 2013’s Dialed Up, the B-Girl Records founder is back with Dialed Up 2, which — just like the first volume — was crafted entirely on her cell phone. For this round, Camp Lo’s Geechi Suede, Zion I, Kev Brown, Prozack Turner, Fat Nice, Groove Da Moast, Rasco and Dave Ghetto all make appearances. It came together as organically as possible.

“Various artist buddies and supporters were just down,” Bahamadia tells HipHopDX. “They liked my beat post on my social media, so I reached out and everyone featured on Dialed Up 2] came through pronto.”

“I believe in making music with those who see the vision and connect with it,” she adds. “Creating is spiritual to me, so making] it happen was unforced, like all things that are meant to be.”

It’s hard to believe the 12-minute mix was created so easily on a phone, but her innovative approach was entirely her idea, a testament to her unwavering artistic vision.

“I was] just being creative and became inspired to take a practical approach utilizing new media tools for music making mainly because I have found an ideal space to get ideas for my work to randomly,” she says.

As she continues helming her B-Girl Records imprint, she’s also putting the finishing touches on her long-awaited fourth studio album, HERE, which is expected to arrive sometime in 2018. It would serve as her first ficial album since 2006’s Good Rap Music. 

Bahamadia’s mission is still focused on delivering that pure boom-bap Hip Hop that she started churning out over two decades ago. At the same time, she’s intent on making more female voices heard.

“We need to bring back balance between women and men, and authentic Hip Hop artists and entrepreneurs,” she says. “The thing is … we here!”

Bahamadia’s Phone-Produced “Dialed Up 2” Project Is Off The Hook

 

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Kid Cudi Said My Writing is Worthless, So I Wrote About It

It's Friday night. I'm sitting in a circle  friends discussing the comments Kid Cudi made surrounding the state hip-hop. (What do you do with your Friday nights?) A few hours earlier, I wrote an article on the subject that wouldn’t be published until Monday, and I decided to pre-trial my opinion.

As much as I thought about what I had written, not once did I believe the article would reach Kid Cudi, and it was almost unimaginable that he'd respond. He’s pretty famous, million-plus followers on Twitter, and probably a plate full business to deal with to start the week.

Fast forward to Monday, the article is out and I’m on the way to my parent's house to give my mom a ride up the street. I check my phone and notice a Twitter notification with a mention from Kid Cudi. Admittedly, I’m excited; he’s acknowledging the article and potentially has something to say.

My excitement turned to a surreal shock when I read the message: 

Kid Cudi Said My Writing is Worthless, So I Wrote About It

I didn’t know what to say. Do I hit him with a meme? A gif? If there's a protocol here, I don't know it. I decided to be respectful and say, “I disagree, but thank you for sharing your 'opinion'.”

I RT’d his comment, so immediately, my followers are beginning to lose their shit. For some reason, I thought that would be the end our conversation.

To my surprise, Scott had more to say. “Like I said, your words hold no weight here. Not anywhere on this planet. Know this about yourself,” he tweeted.

When it comes to my craft, I’ve never been so disrespected. Kid Cudi wrote that. Kid Cudi. The voice all the lonely, depressed and outcast kids told me I’m worthless. This is the same guy that made A Kid Name Cudi and Man on the Moon, two tapes that I held dear because their impact during my high school years. I watched his come up, cheered for his success, and supported his releases.

What was I supposed to say? I honestly had no idea.

Before walking out the door I replied, “Words are my medium. So again, I completely disagree. I’ll continue to use them to get my point across.

I RT’d his second message before getting on the road. My phone is face down, shaking enough to be diagnosed with Parkinson's. Twitter is going crazy, my text messages are filling up, but mom is in the passenger and would have a heart attack if I attempted to text and drive. My mind is racing faster than the traffic, trying to comprehend why he was so obviously irate. Maybe I wouldn’t have been shocked if the piece was slanderous; an attempt to get a rise out him for pageviews, but that wasn’t the case. I was sincere in my rebuttal, and yet my thoughts were met with belittlement and utter disrespect.

By the time I had dropped f my mom, Cudi had deleted the tweets. I can only guess this wasn’t the “message” he wants hip-hop to receive.

Well, I heard it loud and clear. 

His message is that my words are meaningless. His message is that his fame makes him omnipotent and his opinion shouldn’t be questioned by a “sideline nigga.” I was such a fan his come up story, but that was when I was a just a listener and he was just an artist. Now I feel like his music is ruined for me. I can’t separate the man from the musician; he just took a giant shit on my art form, my self-expression.   

I’ve always been pretty fearless with what I choose to write, my fingers are moved by passion, not by name or stature. Now, though, I see how a reaction like this can change a writer's outlook. Especially in the age social media, when the barriers between writer and artist are so small (case in point), writers can prit by getting on the artist's good side, keeping them in a positive light, and reaping the benefits. I couldn’t do it, not without feeling dirty and vile. I’m not for sale, no amount RTs or pageviews can change that.

The relationship rappers have with writers has been more like a dysfunctional marriage for a long time. The closer a writer and rapper are the more they will love you when the words are in their favor, but the moment you write something displeasing, it’s a sign disloyalty. You become a Brutus, and they react accordingly.

After reading articles like, “Irate Rappers Give Journalists A Combat Beat” and “Mad Rappers: Wale, Complex and the History Violence in Hip-Hop Journalism,” it gave me a glimpse at how unpredictable the publishing a story can be. This was before social media and before artists could email in all-caps and send out their frustrations. We see more dialogue now because the digital platforms that connect us, but a few petty words on Twitter are nothing compared to having an irate rapper in your face, challenging you on your perspective, or beating you for it. This was certainly not that.

But who wants to feel like their opinion is being held at gunpoint? As a writer, you’re cheating yourself and your readers if you decide to be biased for the sake relationships and comfortability. If a piece is written without being disrespectful to the artist's craft, that artist doesn't have to agree, but they do have to respect the writer's craft the same.

I understand that trolls exist and artists could be on edge because how much negativity they receive every day, verbal or otherwise. Same with bloggers who will write pieces to ruffle feathers in hopes a traffic increase; they’re playing in oil while smoking cigarettes. Honestly, not every submission will be met with acclaim, not every review will be five mics and not every thought piece will shine your shit and pamper your ideals. But in the current climate integrity is being strangled; the pressure saying something honest with potential backlash, and saying something outlandish for the hope backlash, will only continue adding issues upon the issues.

As I told Kid Cudi, my words are my medium, and I’ll continue to use them to get my point across. No one is here to stroke egos or babysit feelings; we are here to deliver our perspectives and further discussions that surround the genre and culture that we love so much. 

My only vow to rappers and readers is that my mind is open, my ears are open, and my words are honest. No tweet, amount money or famous relationship will change that, and I know my fellow DJBooth brethren all carry the same sentiment.

By Yoh, AKA I’m G.O.O.D., aka @Yoh31

Like this article? DJBooth is committed to quality music journalism, never clickbait. You can join us by downloading our app or following us on Facebook or Twitter.

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Stan Sono – Damelo | Hip Hop Songs

More from Stan Sono

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Prodigy, J Dilla & Kid Cudi Highlight Record Store Day’s Black Friday Releases

Prodigy, J Dilla and Kid Cudi are among a number Hip Hop artists to feature on Record Store Day’s list upcoming releases for Black Friday (November 24).

A picture disc release Prodigy’s 2000 solo single “Keep It Thoro” is one two releases from the late Mobb Deep rapper. There will also be a 2-LP release P’s debut solo album, H.N.I.C.

A two-volume collection music from J Dilla will be released on limited color vinyl (V. 1 on green and V. 2 on purple) through Yancey Media Group. A portion the proceeds will go directly to Dilla’s two daughters, whose priles grace the album covers.

Kid Cudi’s most recent album, Passion, Pain & Demon Slayin’, will also have its own 2-LP release.

Elsewhere, Three 6 Mafia’s Chpt. 2: World Domination will be available on vinyl for the first time ever in celebration the project’s 20th anniversary.

Danger Mouse’s collaboration with Run the Jewels and Big Boi, “Chase Me,” will be released on 12” vinyl. The cut, from the Baby Driver soundtrack, will have a limited release just 2,000 copies.

Record Store Day’s Black Friday event takes place on November 24.

An overview this year’s Hip Hop ferings from the event is below, in artist/title/label/format order.

Record Store Day Exclusive Release

Danger Mouse feat. Run The Jewels and Big Boi – “Chase Me” – Columbia Records – 12” Vinyl

DMC – Back From The Dead: The Legend Lives – Brookvale Records – 12” Vinyl

Prodigy – Keep It Thoro – Legacy Records – 12” Picture Disc

Record Store Day Limited Run / Regional Focus Release

Latyrx – The Album: 20th Anniversary DLX – Real People – 2 X LP

Three 6 Mafia – Chpt 2: World Domination – Get On Down – 2 X LP

Record Store Day First Release

Insane Clown Posse – The Great Milenko: 20th Anniversary Edition – Psychopathic Records – 2 X LP

J Dilla – J Dilla’s Delights V. 1 – Yancey Media Group – LP

J Dilla – J Dilla’s Delights V. 2 – Yancey Media Group – LP

Kid Cudi – Passion, Pain & Demon Slayin’ – Republic – 2 X LP

Lil Jon & The East Side Boyz – Kings Crunk (15th Anniversary Double Platinum Vinyl Edition) – TVT Records – 2 X LP

Murs – 3:16 The 9th Edition – Emipre/Murs 316 – LP

The Notorious B.I.G. – Hypnotize – Bad Boy Records – 12” Vinyl

Sean Price – Refrigerator P – Coalmine Records – 10” Vinyl

Prodigy – H.N.I.C. – Get on Down – 2 X LP

Snoop Dogg – Neva Left – EMPIRE/Doggystyle Records – 2 X LP

Tyga – The Gold Album: 18th Dynasty – EMPIRE/Last Kings Music – LP

Non-Exclusive Records (Also Due Out Black Friday)

Madvillain – Four Tet Remixes 12” EP

MF Doom – Special Herbs 5 Cassette Box Set

To view the full list upcoming releases for Black Friday, visit Record Store Day.

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Sydney proposes reforms to protect nightlife- Dancing Astronaut

Sydney’s notorious have had quite a damaging impact on the city’s once flourishing nightlife. Introduced in 2014, the laws force a 1:30 a.m. lockout and 3 a.m. cease-service policy for all nightclubs and bars in central Sydney and the Kings Cross precinct. These laws have been widely criticized by Australians, including esteemed producer , who went on  as a form protest.

The mayor Sydney, Clover Moore, has since decided that the controversial laws are in desperate need reform. “Unfortunately, the lockouts have had a serious impact on Sydney’s cultural life, businesses and our reputation overseas — and while areas like Kings Cross are safer, we know the balance isn’t right yet in terms Sydney’s nightlife.”

The reforms will aim to adopt the agent change principle for residential establishments within 100 metres a music venue. This rule will shift the onus soundproing new installations from club owners to residential developers, and aims to protect the interests the many nightclubs and live music venues in Sydney.

H/T:

Sydney proposes reforms to protect nightlife- Dancing Astronaut[hupso]
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The Insane Story of How Pimp C Hated the “Big Pimpin” Beat, Refused to Travel for Video Shoot

This is easily one my favorite rap stories, one I've been telling for years, but have yet to see it just straight up typed out. So today I'm setting out to be the change I wish to see in the world. The short version is that Pimp C disliked the "Big Pimpin" beat so much he initially refused to rap on it and then no-showed on the video shoot. Here's the long version. 

Close followers  Pimp's story have known that he wasn't exactly jumping at the chance to work on "Big Pimpin for a while." As he told MTV way back in 2005:  

But that's only scratching the surface the story. Here's the complete story, as told by Bun B on the now dearly-departed "Hype Men" podcast I was involved in back in the day: 

  • JAY-Z, coming f his 5x Platinum Vol. 2... Hard Knock Life album, calls Bun B out the blue, but Bun at first hangs up on him, believing it's a prank call. Jay calls back again, convinces Bun it's really him and says there's a song for his upcoming album he wants UGK on.  
  • Right f the bat, Pimp is unimpressed. He was originally supposed to be on Jay's "Just a Week Ago" but Pimp refused to fly to New York City to record it. If JAY-Z wanted him on the song so bad, let Jay fly to Houston, and so the song never happened. Pimp moved for no man. 
  • Bun convinces Pimp to at least give the song a listen, but when the tapes arrive in the mail—yes, tapes, this was way before email—Pimp's adamant. Fuck that. There's no way he's rapping on such a weird beat.
  • Bun's not about to let the opportunity pass, so he flies to New York, gets a taste  Roc-A-Fella at its peak, records his verse and then slowly but surely wears Pimp down and convinces him to get on the song, if only as a favor to him. Pimp relents, but on one condition—he's only giving Jay eight bars. Not a word more. "I said that's cool, eight bars, no problem, just get on the fucking record," said Bun. "This song's gonna be a big deal. He sent it his verse] back to me and I listened....eight bars. I just rapped for something like 20 bars trying to out rap Jay Z, and this motherfucker just did it in eight bars."
  • "Things U Do" with Mariah Carey was initially supposed to be the big lead single f Vol. 3, but when that song fails to catch on Jay and Dame decide to change plans and give "Big Pimpin" the full single treatment. Plans for a huge video shoot in Trinidad with Hype Williams get underway.
  • Bun B misses his first flight and arrives at the video shoot in Trinidad a little late, expecting to see Pimp already there. Nope. Pimp has once again refused to leave Houston. Hype Williams can't believe Pimp would actually bail on the video shoot so keeps trying to convince him to come. It doesn't work, though, and they leave Trinidad with a massive video for a massive single that has exactly and precisely zero seconds Pimp C in it. 
  • New plan. They find a mansion and beach in the U.S. that looks vaguely "tropical" enough to pass for Trinidad and this time Pimp C shows up for the shoot. 

So with all that in mind, I want you to watch the "Big Pimpin" video again. Fair warning, you're going to have a Matrix moment. As many times as I had watched that video before I heard the full story, it never even occurred to me to wonder why Pimp's verse is so short, why the video changes locations, and why Pimp C is the only rapper to do his verse in that second location.

Prepare to have your mind blown...

The real takeaway here is that Pimp C was the greatest. He dictated the terms his life, his way, and wouldn't move an inch even for some the most famous and wealthy rappers on the planet. Long live the pimp.

Bonus: For more Pimp C goodness, pick up a copy "Sweet Jones: Pimp C's Trill Life Story" by author Julia Beverly.

Like this article? DJBooth is committed to quality music journalism, never clickbait. You can join us by downloading our app or following us on Facebook or Twitter.

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Wiley Feels Guilty Over Rival Dizzee Rascal’s 2003 Stabbing

Wiley and Dizzee Rascal are among the top stars in the Grime genre, but the United Kingdom rappers have not been friends for over 14 years due to a stabbing incident in 2003. Wiley, speaking at an awards ceremony this week, said he feels a bit guilt over what happened to his rival and doesn’t see reconciliation in the pair’s future.

The Sun exclusively reports:

Wiley hopes to make amends with Dizzee Rascal but that bridge is still under construction it appears.

Photo: WENN.com

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